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SBA Loans Fact Sheet- Everything You Need to Know to Buy a Business

If you are seeking financing to buy a business this is a must read! If you have
any questions following this please call Cody Weaver (646)737-5273

Buying and Financing a Business can be difficult but it doesnt have to be. Business Acquisition Expertss has the experince you need to make and acquisition with the most favorable terms.

SBA SOP 5010 5 (E) – as it relates to SBA Loans for BUSINESS ACQUISITIONS p. 81 – Acceptable Use of Loan Proceeds: Business Acquisition, Working Capital, Furniture, Fixtures, Machinery, Equipment, Real Estate, Refinance Business Debt

p.153 – Loan Maturity: Maximum Maturity is 10 years unless largest % of assets financed is Real Estate then maturity may be up to 25 years p.

139 – 141 – Change of Ownership “rules”: 1. Change must result in small business applicant purchasing or acquiring 100% ownership interest in business; Non-owner cannot purchase a partial ownership from seller, and existing owner cannot purchase ownership from a partner if transaction does not result in 100% ownership by purchaser;

2. Seller may not remain as officer, director, stockholder or key employee of the business; may contract as a consultant for no longer than 12 months after purchase;

3. Loan applicant must be a business, not an individual;

4. Lender must verify with IRS the last 3 years tax returns of business being sold;

5. Any Real Estate that is part of a change of ownership cannot be financed separately with a non-SBA guaranteed loan unless SBA loan receives a shared lien position on the real property. (Does not apply to SBA 504 program);

6. SBA considers change of ownership to be a “new” business. Lender is required to: a. Obtain a business valuation (*see valuation below) b. Make a site visit of assets being acquired c. Obtain a Real Estate appraisal for any real property acquired d. Analyze how the change of ownership will benefit the business being purchased (not buyer or seller);

7. SBA loan can finance intangible assets (goodwill, client/customer lists, patents, copyrights, trademarks and agreements not to compete, etc.)

a. If purchase price of business includes intangible assets in excess of $500,000, the borrower and/or seller must provide an equity injection (**see equity requirements below) of at least 25% of the purchase price – or a lender cannot process the application using PLP, and the application must be approved through SBA.

b. “Purchase Price of Business” includes all assets being acquired, including any real property, equipment, and intangible assets.

c. Value of intangible assets is determined by either i) book value reflected on business’s balance sheet, ii) separate appraisal for the particular asset, or iii) the business valuation minus the sum of working capital assets and fixed assets being purchased. Susan Kite /

SBA SOP 5010 5 (E) – as it relates to BUSINESS ACQUISITIONS p. 187 – 188 – Equity Requirements:

1. Lender must determine and document adequacy of equity injection.

2. Source of Equity Injection: a) Cash that is NOT borrowed (can be backed by a gift letter if supported by documentation in 3 below);

b) Cash from a personal loan IF repayment of that loan can be demonstrated from sources other than cash flow of business or owner salary from business;

c) Personal assets, other than cash, injected by owners where value is supported by an outside appraisal, not part of business valuation;

d) Debt that is on FULL STANDBY (no payments during term of SBA loan) or debt on PARTIAL STANDBY (interest-only payments being made). Partial Standby debt can only be considered as equity when there is adequate historical business cash flow available to make the interest payments.

3. Lenders must document and verify all equity injection prior to disbursement of loan proceeds. Borrower must provide: a) copy of a check or wire transfer along with evidence that the check or wire was processed showing the funds were moved into the borrower’s account or escrow; b) copy of the statements of account from which the funds are being withdrawn for each of the two most recent months prior to disbursement showing that the funds were available; and c) subsequent statement of the borrower’s account showing that the funds were deposited or a copy of an escrow settlement statement showing the use of the cash.

p. 194–195 – Business Valuation for Change of Ownership: Lender must determine the value of the business in addition to any real estate, which is valued separately through an appraisal.

1. If total amount being financed, minus appraised value of real estate and/or equipment being financed is under $251,000, lender may perform their own valuation;

2. If GREATER than $250,000 or if there is a close relationship between buyer and seller, then lender must request an independent valuation from a “qualified source” that regularly receives pay for business valuations and is either CPA or accredited by a recognized organization listed on page 194 of SOP.

3. Lender may use a going concern appraisal to meet valuation requirement if i) loan is used to purchase a special use property, ii) appraiser is either a “qualified source” or has completed a specific Appraisal Institute course, and iii) appraisal allocates separate values to land, building, equipment and intangible assets.

4. Any amount in excess of business valuation may NOT be financed with the SBA guaranteed loan.

Cody Weaver M&A Adviser at Busines Acquisition Experts
www.acquisitionspro.com

Read more

Business Valuation: Do the Financials Tell the Whole Story?

Many experts say no! These experts believe that only half of the business valuation should be based on the financials (the number-crunching), with the other half of the business valuation based on non-financial information (the subjective factors).

What subjective factors are they referring to?  SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats – the primary factors that make up the subjective, or non-financial, analysis. Below you will find a more detailed look at the areas that help us evaluate a company’s SWOT.

Industry Status – A company’s value increases when its associated industry is expanding, and its value decreases in any of the following situations:  its industry is constantly fighting technical obsolescence; its industry involves a commodity subject to ongoing price wars; its industry is severely impacted by foreign competition; or its industry is negatively impacted by governmental policies, controls, or pricing.

Geographic Location – A company is worth more if it is located in states or countries that have a favorable infrastructure, advantageous tax rates, or higher reimbursement rates.  A company with access to an ample educated and competitive work force will also enjoy increased value.

Management – A company with low turnover in management and a solid second-tier management team comprised of different age levels is also worth more.

Facilities – A company operating profitably at 70 percent capacity is worth more than a company currently near capacity. Equipment should be up to date and any leases – either equipment or real estate – renewable at reasonable rates.

Products or Services – A company is worth more if its products or services are proprietary, are diversified with some pricing power, and have, preferably, a recognizable brand name. In addition, new products or services should be introduced on a regular basis.

Customers – A company is worth more if there is not heavy customer concentration, but rather recurring revenue from long-time, loyal customers, as well as from new customers created through a regular and systematic sales process.

Competition – A company not contending head to head with powerful competitors such as Microsoft or Wal-Mart will rate a higher value.

Suppliers – Finally, a company is worth more if it is not dependent on single sourced key items or items available from only a limited number of suppliers.

 

Copyright 2012 Business Brokerage Press, Inc.